We may have found some semblance of good news at the end of last month in a Washington Post article:

“The latest drafts of health insurance applications related to the Affordable Care Act are shorter and easier to complete than previous editions that drew wide criticism for their complexity. Applicants must still provide financial information, but questions about health history that insurers now ask will be eliminated.”

“…applicants will have to provide detailed snapshots of their incomes to see whether they qualify for government assistance. Individuals will have to gather tax returns, pay stubs and other financial records before filling out the application…Low-income uninsured people will be steered to government programs like Medicaid.”

“Administration officials expect most consumers to apply online through new health insurance marketplaces that will be operating in each state. A single application form will serve to route consumers to either private plans or the Medicaid program. Identification, citizenship and immigration status, as well as income details, are supposed to be verified in close to real time through a federal “data hub” that will involve pinging Social Security, Homeland Security and the Internal Revenue Service. Currently, applying for health insurance individually entails filling out a lengthy questionnaire about your health. Under Obama’s overhaul, insurers will no longer be able to turn away the sick, or charge them more. The health care questions will disappear, but they’ll be replaced by questions about your income. Consumers who underestimate their incomes could be in for an unwelcome surprise later on in the form of smaller tax refunds.”

Is this good news?  Would you rather be submitting health information or financial information?  Does three pages seem more appropriate, or is it still too long?  Please do share your thoughts and comments in the comments section below or on our Facebook page.

Add Comment