Most of us have been admonished to never take up smoking.
And we have heard about studies that demonstrate how smoking is tied with various diseases, especially for the women in our lives.
But did you ever think the correlation would also be tied to colon cancer?

One of our colleague’s grandmothers passed away from colon cancer, so this disease hits close to home for us here at Geldin Insurance.  Interestingly, she did not smoke.  But her husband did. Perhaps there will be a follow up study demonstrating the correlation with second-hand smoke.

Does someone you know have colon cancer?
Do you smoke?

According to an article published on Nurse.com:  “Gram and colleagues found that female smokers had a 19% increased risk compared with women who never had smoked, while male smokers had an 8% increased risk compared with never-smokers.

In addition, women who started smoking when they were 16 or younger and women who had smoked for 40 years or more had a substantially increased risk of about 50%. The dose-response association between the number of cigarettes smoked per day, number of years smoked and number of pack-years smoked and colon cancer risk was stronger for women than it was for men.”

If you want more details, you can read the abstract.

Although our society is already very anti-smoking, other parts of the country, and the world, do not discourage smoking nearly enough.  Maybe this study will encourage more parents, teachers, and other responsible adults to squelch any urge young girls in their network may have.

Is there a young girl that you know that needs to learn of this study before she starts to smoke?
Could we present this in a better format for you to share it with her?
Please share your stories in the comments section below or on our Facebook page.
Thank you! We look forward to reading your stories and learning from your experiences.

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