Wow, another week with 2 important changes we thought you should know about.
Here they are in the order we received them:

  • “Governor signs bill to let doctors graduate faster”: according to an article found in the Sacramento Business Journal, some student doctors could graduate in 3 years instead of 4. This means an influx of new skilled doctors at a time when there may be a shortage, and less school debt for those doctors at the top of their game (and less stress for them).

“Accelerated programs focus on individual skills and academic achievement instead of the length of time students are in school. The idea is to offer an alternate track, not replace traditional medical school. Only students who demonstrate a high level of scientific and medical understanding are eligible for accelerated programs.

“AB 1838 was sponsored by the University of California — which operates six medical schools in the state — and the Medical Board of California, which regulates, licenses and disciplines doctors.

“The bill takes effect in January 2015, but a pilot program is already underway.

“The UC Davis School of Medicine is working with Kaiser Permanente on the first accelerated medical education program in California. The first group of six students started classes in June.”

So, what do you think: are you happy that some doctors are getting this option or not?

  • Experts Predict that Reaching the Remaining Ununsured in California May Be Difficult and Expensive: According to a recent article by California Healthline, “the last push to get the remaining uninsured signed up won’t be as easy” as getting folks initially enrolled.

According to the “Commonwealth Fund survey released last week found that California had reduced the number of uninsured residents by half — from 22% to 11% during the first open enrollment period.”

Beth Capell, policy advocate for Health Access California, said: “Signing up that last 11% will be a challenge. Of this group, we have some who don’t speak English, people who are young and healthy and don’t think they need insurance, or people who still don’t think they can afford it.”

Do you still know anyone that is lacking coverage?

Please let us know how we can help them (they can either call us at 877.789.5831, or complete the confidential form below and one of our experts will get in touch with them right away)!

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