Ok, so this article from Medcity News caught our attention and we just had to share it with you.  You may be used to much more serious topics on our blog, but, who knows, some of these may have serious implications for the health industry.

You may have noticed that 3D printing is nearing its tipping point, but did you notice that GE has created ‘3D Printing Day’?  They celebrated last week and somehow we missed it.

This article noted 5 medical uses of 3D printing this year:

1.  Princeton University researchers found a potential use for 3D printing to “intertwine biological tissues and electronics to create an artificial ear that’s even more sensitive than a human ear:”

2.  “University of Nottingham researchers are also experimenting with using 3D printing to combine technologies. They’ve developed a bone implant that consists of a 3D printed bone scaffold coated with 3D printed stem cells. The vision is that after it’s implanted, the scaffold degrades over time and is replaced by a stem cell-grown bone.”  (how cool is that??):

3. University of Michigan doctors “made a tiny trachea splint out of biopolymers to save a two-month-old baby’s life.”

4. Across The Pond, A UK engineer started the Open Hand Project “to make prosthetic hands more affordable to amputees by 3D printing them. A crowdfunding campaign through Indiegogo brought in more than $70,000 for the project.”

5. A University of Glasgow chemist shared his vision for “turning a 3D printer into one that could assemble molecules to print medicine more cheaply and at the point of need.”

Our staff couldn’t decide which project they liked most. What about you? Did any inspire you to share the article with your social media friends?

Please share your thoughts and comments below, or on our facebook page.
Although none of these projects are available through any current health insurer, please complete the form below if you would like us to check on your behalf!

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